Responsible environmental stewardship

Consistent approach across our global portfolio

The nature of mining dictates that air, water and energy management, biodiversity protection and land rehabilitation will consistently be key focus areas of our environmental stewardship. The degree to which we manage these at each of our operations will be influenced by their different geographies.

At an operational level, our work is governed by our Group Environmental Policy, Standards and Guidelines. Adherence to these requirements is tested during combined assurance audits. This overarching architecture aims for a consistent approach across our global portfolio, while also allowing operations to adapt their environment management programmes to varying operational, geographical, climate and regulatory settings.

Each operating site’s unique suite of controls is also maintained through its Environmental Management System (EMS), which is certified to the ISO 14001:2015 standard. Collectively, these processes and systems provide the foundation for securing and enhancing our licence to operate.

We continue to progress towards further integration between key functions. For example, in preparation for the recommencement of operations at our Obuasi mine in Ghana, we developed an enhanced management operating system that sets out the accountabilities and workflow maps within the environment function and between the environment and line functions. It is anticipated that this integration will contribute to improved environmental outcomes for the site.

Water

Water is a valuable and often scarce resource, making water management a vital focus area for the company. Our water is imported from three major sources: utility companies; surface water sources, which include rivers and lakes; and groundwater sources, which include groundwater draining into mine pits and into deep underground workings.

A primary objective of water management at site level, is to minimise the volume of imported water, often working towards a site-specific target. We also track performance by monitoring the water recycling percentage and the volume of water imported per tonne of ore treated at site level. Another primary water management objective is to prevent the contamination of water resources by our activities. Although we operate some zero discharge sites, operations in wet climates typically treat and release excess water in keeping with regulatory water quality discharge limits.

In aligning our water reporting to the ICMM Consistent Water Reporting guide, we undertook an analysis of our operating sites’ water context using the WWF Water Risk filter. The results of this analysis were adapted with local site knowledge and are summarised graphically below. In addition, we present a group overview of our interactions with water over 2019.

In South Africa at our West Wits operations, we continue to manage acid mine drainage (AMD) that flows from the disused neighbouring mines each day. We have carefully managed the risk of water spilling from the West Wits water circuit by balancing our site water inventories. This somewhat delicate balance has thus far been achieved by accelerated water evaporation technologies and by using the water for the reprocessing of old tailings storage facilities after its acidity has been neutralised.

At Geita mine in Tanzania, we have initiated a project where the potential for using bacteria to directly remediate sulphate in groundwater, is being assessed. After a successful proof of concept field trial, the project is scaling up to a larger scale field trial. If this in-situ remediation approach succeeds, it has scope to be applied at other company operations.


[chart]

Source: WWF Water Risk Filter

[chart]

Source: WWF Water Risk Filter


Energy and climate change

For more than a decade, AngloGold Ashanti has been proactive in acting on climate change, both through its own strategy and through industry associations. In 2008, the company provided early leadership when it committed to an ambitious greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity reduction target of 30% by 2022.

In the context of mining, emission targets become progressively more challenging to meet, given that mining is by its very nature more energy intensive each year. Lower grades mean more rock shifted and as mining progresses further away from infrastructure, so longer distances are travelled, requiring more energy. The group target was successfully achieved in 2018, ahead of the 2022 target date.

In 2019, we continued to mitigate our carbon footprint, marginally reducing our GHG emissions intensity by 1%, 31.8kg (2019) versus 32.1kg (2018) of GHG per tonne treated, and kept our absolute GHG emissions flat. This was despite a 3.7% increase in the total energy we used to sustain production. These improvements were led by continued benefits from energy efficiency gains at our South African mines, and which despite a 9.3% increase in the South African grid emission factor, managed a 8.5% reduction in their absolute emissions and a 9.2% reduction in their emissions intensity, compared to 2018.

External investor and consumer pressure around ESG issues, especially climate change, continues to intensify. This has been particularly acute in the past year and among some of AngloGold Ashanti’s largest shareholders. While additional asset sales will naturally lead to further reductions in emissions intensity, it is crucial for the company to develop a comprehensive new climate change strategy. This will seek to develop updated emission reduction targets, ensure that we insulate our operations against physical climate risks that may impact both our operations and host communities, implement appropriate climate disclosure systems and maximise further opportunities for cost-saving energy efficiency programmes. We will be guided by, among other things, the ICMM’s updated Climate Change Position Statement and through use of the ICMM-hosted Mining Climate Assessment Tool (MiCA), which we have already used to model impacts from climate change on TSF design and construction.

In 2020, we also intend transitioning our primary climate change disclosure platform, which has historically been done under the Carbon Disclosure Project, to disclosing in accordance with the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure (TCFD) recommendations.

Carbon tax

The South African carbon tax was signed into law by President Cyril Ramaphosa and gazetted in May 2019. The first phase of the act came into effect on 1 June 2019. This phase applies to Scope 1 emitters until 31 December 2022 and contains tax-free emission allowances. In 2019, our South African operation’s Scope 1 emissions were under 17Kt and will not attract material carbon taxes for the 2019 period.

Sites certified to ISO 14001:2015

93%


Sites certified to the International Cyanide Management Code

87%

Obuasi will initiate processes towards these certifications, once ramped up to full production in 2021.

Tailings

In response to the Brumadinho Tailings Storage Facility (TSF) failure, a coalition comprising the ICMM, the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) and UNEP co-convened an independent review of global tailings management practice. The aim was to establish an international standard on TSF management that seeks to eliminate catastrophic failures of TSFs.

Professor Bruno Oberle was appointed by the co-conveners as independent chair of the Global Tailings Review (GTR) panel. The GTR panel issued a public consultation draft in November 2019. AngloGold Ashanti provided comment on the draft standard through the ICMM, which consolidated comments from its 27 members companies. The standard is scheduled to be completed in 2020, and if it enjoys the support of all three co-convenors, it will be adopted by the ICMM as a requirement for its members.

The Brumadinho TSF failure also resulted in a significant global push for increased transparency around tailings facilities, prompting a coalition comprising the Church of England Pensions Board (CofE), the Swedish Council on Ethics and the UN-supported PRI to request that global mining companies publicly disclose essential information relating to their TSFs. Our response, which will be updated when appropriate, can be found on our mine tailings disclosure document.

Integrated closure management

There is an increased focus on managing the social aspects of closure as operations wind down, which is consistent with the ICMM’s recently updated guidance on closure management.

The social impact of closure is perhaps the most difficult element of closure to gauge and manage effectively. There is growing emphasis on contributing toward resilient and sustainable communities during the lifecycle of the mining operation.

We are working to achieve this goal by engaging with our communities, allowing them to identify the projects they would like to see developed in the areas of health, education, agriculture, small business and supply chain development. Simultaneously, we will continue to rehabilitate disturbed land as we mine, through this we face a number of challenges, which include ASM.

In Mali, the implementation of the Yatela mine’s closure plan remains on hold while the share purchase agreement with the government of Mali, signed in April 2019 and awaiting ratification, is finalised.

At Sadiola, mine operations ceased in 2018, while stockpile processing continued. An integrated mine closure plan was submitted to the government in October. In December, AngloGold Ashanti (AGA) together with its joint venture partner, IAMGOLD Corporation (IMG) agreed to sell their interests in Société d’Exploitation des Mines d’Or de Sadiola S.A. (“SEMOS”) to Allied Gold Corp (“Allied Gold”). SEMOS’ principal asset is the Sadiola Mine located in the Kayes region of Western Mali. AGA and IMG each hold a 41% interest in SEMOS with the remaining 18% interest held by the Government of Mali (see press release for more details).

At Geita in Tanzania, the mine submitted an integrated mine closure plan to the National Mine Closure Commission in October 2019. Discussions around the posting of a rehabilitation bond, in the form of a bank guarantee, will start once the mine closure plan is approved.

2019 Reportable environmental incidents
Incident descriptionOur response
In early September, the Savuka Gold Plant’s residue tanks overflowed due to operational challenges. This resulted in tailings slurry being released into a network of drainage canals beyond the plant boundary and reaching the Wonderfonteinspruit watercourse via the Welverdiend canal.Immediate response measures were put in place to stop, monitor and mitigate the effects of the spill, which impacted an estimated surface area of 6,000m². Potentially affected parties downstream were notified, as were the Department of Water and Sanitation and the National Nuclear Regulator. The plant’s residue pumping, and control system was reviewed to ensure that tailings slurry can consistently be delivered to the Savuka Tailings Storage Facility.
In late September, a pipeline, conveying tailings from the Mine Waste Solutions Plant to the Kareerand Tailings Storage Facility, failed near the Koekemoerspruit crossing, a stream that flows into the Vaal River. Subsequent water quality monitoring at key locations in the Koekemoerspruit and at the Midvaal Water Company’s intake, downstream in the Vaal River, confirmed its effects were limited to the contained area.Pumping operations were suspended and a containment berm was constructed downstream. Regulators and the landowners adjacent to the watercourse, were notified of the incident. Recovery of the impacted section of the Koekemoerspruit will be assessed through in-stream bio-monitoring by an independent specialist, following clean-up of the watercourse and adjacent surface areas impacted by the spill, an estimated area of 11,000m².
During October, at Siguiri mine’s process plant, construction work for upgrading of the spillage containment infrastructure was in progress when operational challenges with reagent make-up was experienced. This caused cyanide-bearing solution to drain to a temporary spillage pond located inside the process plant fence. A valve on the pipeline connecting this internal pond to an external spillage pond, which served to increase spillage holding capacity, was in the open position. This allowed an estimated 80m² of the cyanide-bearing solution to reach the external pond, causing the death of a cow and 4 birds that consumed the water.Upon discovery, immediate actions were taken to isolate and detoxify the water in the external pond. Regulators and local government representatives from Siguiri, were immediately notified.
Indicator 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Reportable environmental incidents32314
Direct raw materials: Ore processed (Kilotonnes)
Group80,76980,07185,41985,50493,346
Argentina2,8942,8823,3093,1413,304
Cerro Vanguardia2,8942,8823,3093,1413,304
Australia12,73211,85111,68710,96810,037
Sunrise Dam4,0864,0314,0334,0413,880
Tropicana8,6477,8197,6546,9276,157
Brazil4,5314,1334,4244,0953,914
AGA Mineração3,2322,9712,9992,7782,607
Serra Grande1,2991,1621,4251,3171,307
Ghana5,1195,3465,0585,1295,656
Iduapriem5,1015,3465,0585,1294,702
Obuasi19---954
Guinea10,38210,42911,67712,06211,741
Siguiri10,38210,42911,67712,06211,741
Mali4,7735,1835,0305,0935,546
Sadiola4,7735,1835,0304,9085,062
Yatela---185484
South Africa35,13234,90138,87739,49736,786
Mine Waste Solutions26,59826,10326,32226,08324,451
Vaal River3,8004,0827,9408,9879,082
West Wits4,7344,7164,6154,4273,253
Tanzania5,2065,3455,3585,5175,152
Geita5,2065,3455,3585,5175,152
USA----11,210
Cripple Creek & Victor----11,210
Direct raw materials: Liquid fossil fuels (Kilolitres)
Group332,127318,102318,701289,345343,125
Argentina15,25115,59118,76116,05017,028
Cerro Vanguardia15,25115,59118,76116,05017,028
Australia75,54468,83766,19865,141103,496
Sunrise Dam12,80416,13914,19312,34521,336
Tropicana62,74052,69852,00552,79682,160
Brazil19,51816,39118,74116,71815,077
AGA Mineração13,32211,16913,03711,22410,700
Serra Grande6,1965,2215,7045,4944,378
Ghana26,75127,92425,83413,90313,377
Iduapriem23,53127,36925,43413,56811,865
Obuasi3,2205554003351,512
Guinea71,96455,55758,31858,62953,913
Siguiri71,96455,55758,31858,62953,913
Mali29,19233,26737,20935,99536,689
Sadiola29,19233,26736,95233,45133,671
Yatela--2572,5443,018
South Africa3781,8155,1865,2606,871
Mine Waste Solutions342,62516595
Vaal River97761,7353,4853,708
West Wits3661,0368261,6103,068
Tanzania93,52998,72088,45477,64974,307
Geita93,52998,72088,45477,64974,307
USA----22,367
Cripple Creek & Victor----22,367
Direct raw materials: Lubricants (Kilolitres)
Group6,2525,6985,9325,1026,133
Argentina439380414441517
Cerro Vanguardia439380414441517
Australia1,2571,1401,098714910
Sunrise Dam416516472177409
Tropicana841624626538501
Brazil9999019541,025939
AGA Mineração775658698782690
Serra Grande224243256243249
Ghana942569378500458
Iduapriem746547353462346
Obuasi196222538112
Guinea68161268092106
Siguiri68161268092106
Mali119272371376388
Sadiola119272359360347
Yatela--121641
South Africa293387801802676
Mine Waste Solutions2834291817
Vaal River269251319297
West Wits239344521465362
Tanzania1,5221,43712361,1521,087
Geita1,5221,43712361,1521,087
USA----824
Cripple Creek & Victor----824
Direct raw materials: Explosives (Tonnes)
Group55,22553,53352,13641,20346,310
Argentina4,2853,5944,3684,0053,616
Cerro Vanguardia4,2853,5944,3684,0053,616
Australia27,61022,50822,42615,43314,678
Sunrise Dam2,7891,1311,0492,060827
Tropicana24,82121,37721,37713,37313,851
Brazil5,9765,6655,8634,0464,283
AGA Mineração4,1083,7664,3822,3002,662
Serra Grande1,8681,8991,4811,7461,621
Ghana8,99211,1909,1487,5155,399
Iduapriem8,75311,1909,1487,5155,181
Obuasi239---218
Guinea2,5041,3708991,295997
Siguiri2,5041,3708991,295997
Mali-961,826858226
Sadiola-961,826858226
Yatela-----
South Africa6828411,6152,4102,507
Mine Waste Solutions-----
Vaal River--4795701,242
West Wits6828411,1361,8401,265
Tanzania5,1758,2715,9915,6406,073
Geita5,1758,2715,9915,6406,073
USA----8,531
Cripple Creek & Victor----8,531
Direct raw materials: Cyanide (Tonnes)
Group27,99026,45124,11124,39427,153
Argentina9951,0741,2781,0721,015
Cerro Vanguardia9951,0741,2781,0721,015
Australia2,3994,1194,0114,6964,130
Sunrise Dam1,6261,5001,2021,2441,360
Tropicana7732,6192,8093,4522,770
Brazil1,3101,2311,4261,2611,289
AGA Mineração738781878728746
Serra Grande572450548533543
Ghana1,5351,5901,4401,3402,305
Iduapriem1,4201,5901,4401,3401,240
Obuasi115---1,065
Guinea4,9793,1862,5082,3782,392
Siguiri4,9793,1862,5082,3782,392
Mali1,0341,8902,0032,7782,603
Sadiola1,0341,8901,7791,9261,731
Yatela--224852872
South Africa14,10611,84210,1229,6729,573
Mine Waste Solutions8,5818,8736,4306,3496,469
Vaal River3,7341,2701,9751,8632,020
West Wits1,7911,6991,7171,4601,084
Tanzania1,6321,5191,3231,1971,105
Geita1,6321,5191,3231,1971,105
USA----2,740
Cripple Creek & Victor----2,740
Total acid consumption (Tonnes)
Group11,34918,77754,94461,438109,935
Argentina2,0341,3701,9451,9521,830
Cerro Vanguardia2,0341,3701,9451,9521,830
Australia9581,6221,6461,4231,326
Sunrise Dam623569571572594
Tropicana3351,0541,075851732
Brazil1,8071,6001,3521,8221,631
AGA Mineração1,7521,5281,3361,7981,611
Serra Grande5572162420
Ghana155120189191483
Iduapriem136118157191310
Obuasi19232-173
Guinea6356801,201559156
Siguiri6356801,201559156
Mali245533550723619
Sadiola245533550723619
Yatela-----
South Africa5,27412,66247,86154,589103,620
Mine Waste Solutions1,2812,8114,3809,68634,565
Vaal River2,7438,94642,69743,79568,255
West Wits1,2509057841,108800
Tanzania241189199178178
Geita241189199178178
USA----93
Cripple Creek & Victor----93
Total alkali consumption (Tonnes)
Group119,954119,533132,653133,641215,071
Argentina2,0212,3222,0832,0831,960
Cerro Vanguardia2,0212,3222,0832,0831,960
Australia32,30729,08122,30325,96521,942
Sunrise Dam14,35813,7516,8119,5819,214
Tropicana17,94915,33115,49216,38412,728
Brazil16,30120,56922,88618,10815,111
AGA Mineração15,06719,67821,25816,73813,858
Serra Grande1,2348911,6281,3701,253
Ghana3,4683,9223,6093,1276,505
Iduapriem3,4003,9223,6093,1243,220
Obuasi68--33,285
Guinea15,60114,74715,11715,63313,336
Siguiri15,60114,74715,11715,63313,336
Mali4,1347,5368,36812,01613,043
Sadiola4,1347,5368,36811,0659,945
Yatela---9513,098
South Africa41,02036,74053,98650,93274,994
Mine Waste Solutions27,93026,76524,82421,69830,775
Vaal River9,7166,30825,61326,38742,016
West Wits3,3743,6673,5492,8472,203
Tanzania5,1034,6164,1505,7775,125
Geita5,1034,6164,1505,7775,125
USA----63,055
Cripple Creek & Victor----63,055
Non-hazardous waste
Non-hazardous waste by type (tonnes) 14,814 13,755 20,773 19,688 19,073
Recycled ferrous metal waste 14,258 12,97319,94917,79617,772
Recycled non-ferrous metal waste5567828241,8921,301
General waste (tonnes)40,33833,01948,04358,47752,263
Recycled1,4441,0181,8394,8459,242
On-site disposal20,10931,03145,35044,24341,668
Off-site disposal18,7859708549,3891,353
Hazardous waste by type
Battery waste (Tonnes)9140361110154
Recycled8236361109141
On-site disposal-0000
Off-site disposal940.02113
Hydrocarbon waste (m³) **1,4442,9743,7865,1628,235
Recycled 1,2162,0422,2911,9922,439
On-site disposal---327131
Off-site disposal2289321,4952,8435,665
  • ** Excluding Tropicana mine data due to incomplete dataset
Other hazardous waste incl. fluorescent lighting and chemical and solvent waste (Tonnes)25,33023,80331,37724,68928,998
Recycled857729703614963
On-site disposal24,22522,77630,57723,84927,135
Off-site disposal24829897226900
Tailings deposited per country (Megatonnes)
Group80.7780.0789.7685.5093.35
Australia12.7311.8511.6910.9710.04
Brazil4.534.134.424.13.91
Ghana5.125.355.065.135.66
Guinea10.3810.4311.6812.0611.74
Mali4.775.185.035.095.55
South Africa35.1334.938.8839.5036.79
Tanzania5.215.355.365.525.15
USA-00011.21
Overburden and waste rock placed per country (Megatonnes)
Group165.32172.48191.56162.56154.69
Argentina17.5815.5918.6216.4514.64
Australia86.2579.7185.8166.1150.4
Brazil9.045.4511.459.169.02
Ghana26.3932.9930.2922.7217.09
Guinea10.137.87.9711.8911.84
Mali-0.008.137.8710.52
South Africa-0.000.000.000.00
Tanzania15.9330.9429.3128.3724.19
USA-0.000.000.0016.99
Energy consumption (Petajoules)
Group26.3225.3829.7628.5529.06
Argentina1.861.871.901.761.69
Cerro Vanguardia1.861.871.901.761.69
Australia7.686.726.325.625.14
Sunrise Dam2.672.492.182.031.97
Tropicana5.014.234.143.593.17
Brazil2.452.262.332.182.01
AGA Mineração1.831.721.771.641.53
Serra Grande0.620.540.560.540.48
Ghana1.991.841.721.321.45
Iduapriem1.411.581.461.020.89
Obuasi0.580.260.260.300.56
Guinea3.022.292.402.582.50
Siguiri3.022.292.402.582.50
Mali1.231.311.551.501.52
Sadiola1.231.311.551.401.40
Yatela-0.000.000.100.12
South Africa4.405.1710.0510.5410.65
Mine Waste Solutions0.820.870.830.740.73
Vaal River0.601.204.614.874.89
West Wits2.983.104.614.935.03
Tanzania3.693.923.493.072.93
Geita3.693.923.493.072.93
USA-0.000.000.001.16
Cripple Creek & Victor-0.000.000.001.16
Energy intensity (Gigajoule per metric tonne treated)
Group0.330.320.350.330.31
Argentina0.640.650.580.560.51
Cerro Vanguardia0.640.650.580.560.51
Australia0.600.570.540.510.51
Sunrise Dam0.650.620.540.500.51
Tropicana0.580.540.540.520.52
Brazil0.540.550.530.530.51
AGA Mineração0.570.580.590.590.59
Serra Grande0.470.470.390.410.37
Ghana0.280.300.340.260.26
Iduapriem0.280.300.290.200.19
Obuasi-0.000.000.000.59
Guinea0.290.220.210.210.21
Siguiri0.290.220.210.210.21
Mali0.260.250.310.290.27
Sadiola0.260.250.310.280.28
Yatela-0.000.000.540.25
South Africa0.130.150.260.270.29
Mine Waste Solutions0.030.0330.030.030.03
Vaal River0.160.2940.580.540.54
West Wits0.630.6571.001.111.55
Tanzania0.710.730.650.560.57
Geita0.710.730.650.560.57
USA-0.000.000.000.10
Cripple Creek & Victor-0.000.000.000.10
  • The Obuasi redevelopment project poured its first gold in December 2019. It will reach its full production by the end of 2020 and is therefore excluded.
GHG emissions (Kilotonnes of GHG)
Group 2,5702,5713,9534,0624,162
Argentina101102106120115
Cerro Vanguardia101102106120115
Australia449395372336336
Sunrise Dam146140122113116
Tropicana303255250223220
Brazil7666766056
AGA Mineração5245524141
Serra Grande2421241915
Ghana185165160149174
Iduapriem12113412410895
Obuasi6431364179
Guinea205156163194189
Siguiri205156163194189
Mali8489106111113
Sadiola8489106104104
Yatela---79
South Africa1,1391,3322,7332,8642,756
Mine Waste Solutions 210210201207193
Vaal River 1733171,2421,2821,232
West Wits 8358051,2901,3751,331
Tanzania251266238228218
Geita251266238228218
USA-000204
Cripple Creek & Victor-000204
GHG emissions intensity (Kilograms of GHG per tonne treated)
Group 3232464845
Argentina3535323835
Cerro Vanguardia3535323835
Australia7133323134
Sunrise Dam3635302830
Tropicana3533333236
Brazil3416171515
AGA Mineração1615171516
Serra Grande1818171412
Ghana2431322931
Iduapriem2425252120
Obuasi000083
Guinea2015141616
Siguiri2015141616
Mali 1817212220
Sadiola1817212121
Yatela-004018
South Africa 229 256 444 461 553
Mine Waste Solutions 88888
Vaal River 4578156143136
West Wits 176171280311409
Tanzania4850444142
Geita4850444142
USA-00018
Cripple Creek & Victor-00018
  • The Obuasi redevelopment project poured its first gold in December 2019. It will reach its full production by the end of 2020 and is therefore excluded.
Direct and indirect energy (Petajoules)
Group
Indirect energy6.486.8511.3511.7612.17
Direct energy19.8518.5418.4216.7916.90
Sadiola
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy1.231.311.551.401.40
Yatela
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy---0.100.12
Obuasi
Indirect energy0.450.240.250.290.50
Direct energy0.130.020.020.010.06
Iduapriem
Indirect energy0.480.500.450.490.43
Direct energy0.931.081.000.540.47
Siguiri
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy3.022.292.402.582.50
Geita
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy3.693.923.493.072.93
Sunrise Dam
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy2.672.492.182.031.97
Tropicana
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy5.014.234.143.593.17
Cripple Creek & Victor
Indirect energy----0.23
Direct energy----0.93
AGA Mineração
Indirect energy0.910.800.810.710.65
Direct energy0.920.920.960.930.88
Serra Grande
Indirect energy0.370.340.330.320.31
Direct energy0.240.210.230.220.17
Cerro Vanguardia
Indirect energy-----
Direct energy1.861.871.901.761.69
Vaal River (Input)
Indirect energy0.601.174.264.364.42
Direct energy0.000.030.350.510.48
West Wits (Input)
Indirect energy2.963.064.584.874.91
Direct energy0.010.040.030.060.12
Mine Waste Solutions
Indirect energy0.700.740.660.740.72
Direct energy0.120.130.160.010.00
Direct and indirect emissions (Kilotonnes of GHG)
Group
Direct GHG emissions 1,233 1,147 1,205 1,182 1,318
Indirect GHG emissions 1,337 1,424 2,747 2,880 2,844
Sadiola
Direct GHG emissions8489106104104
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Yatela
Direct GHG emissions---79
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Obuasi
Direct GHG emissions91118
Indirect GHG emissions15529354071
Iduapriem
Direct GHG emissions6373684035
Indirect GHG emissions5861556860
Siguiri
Direct GHG emissions205156163194189
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Geita
Direct GHG emissions251266238228218
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Sunrise Dam
Direct GHG emissions146140122113116
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Tropicana
Direct GHG emissions303255250223220
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Cripple Creek & Victor
Direct GHG emissions----155
Indirect GHG emissions----49
AGA Mineração
Direct GHG emissions3832363636
Indirect GHG emissions14131665
Serra Grande
Direct GHG emissions1714151613
Indirect GHG emissions87932
Cerro Vanguardia
Direct GHG emissions101102106120115
Indirect GHG emissions-----
Vaal River (Input)
Direct GHG emissions02465954
Indirect GHG emissions1733151 1961 2231 178
West Wits (Input)
Direct GHG emissions75404245
Indirect GHG emissions8288001 2511 3331 286
Mine Waste Solutions
Direct GHG emissions9101400
Indirect GHG emissions201200186206192
NOx,Sox (tonnes)
Oxides of Nitrogen4,8624,6244,0734,4963,916
Oxides of Sulphur143117170629317
Water use (Megalitres)
Group47,89645,89252,21950,71659,601
Argentina1,5121,5961,4871,1521,121
Cerro Vanguardia1,5121,5961,4871,1521,121
Australia8,6987,7346,7837,5776,648
Sunrise Dam1,8981,8081,1151,7791,772
Tropicana6,8015,9265,6685,7984,876
Brazil7,2686,2176,7996,9157,466
AGA Mineração6,8254,7175,2955,2925,959
Serra Grande4431,5001,5041,6231,507
Ghana801,6362,1379363,879
Iduapriem801,6362,137936750
Obuasi----3,129
Guinea7,0836,0276,3493,3955,145
Siguiri7,0836,0276,3493,3955,145
Mali5,4094,2013,4763,9444,658
Sadiola5,4094,2013,4763,9404,625
Yatela---433
South Africa14,61714,77020,50323,16125,183
Mine Waste Solutions7,7797,0076,0026,4757,974
Vaal River3,5814,50710,81312,27513,259
West Wits3,2573,2563,6884,4113,949
Tanzania3,2293,7114,6893,6373,249
Geita3,2293,7114,6893,6373,249
USA----2,252
Cripple Creek & Victor----2,252
  • The Obuasi redevelopment project poured its first gold in December 2019. It will reach its full production by the end of 2020 and is therefore excluded.
Water use efficiency (Kilolitres per tonne)
Group0.590.570.610.590.64
Argentina0.520.550.450.370.34
Cerro Vanguardia0.520.550.450.370.34
Australia0.680.650.580.690.66
Sunrise Dam0.460.450.280.440.46
Tropicana0.790.760.740.840.79
Brazil1.601.501.541.691.91
AGA Mineração2.111.591.761.902.29
Serra Grande0.341.291.061.231.15
Ghana0.020.310.420.180.69
Iduapriem0.020.310.420.180.16
Obuasi-0.000.000.003.28
Guinea0.680.580.540.280.44
Siguiri0.680.580.540.280.44
Mali1.130.810.690.770.84
Sadiola1.130.810.690.800.91
Yatela-0.000.000.020.07
South Africa0.420.420.530.590.68
Mine Waste Solutions0.290.270.230.250.33
Vaal River0.941.101.361.371.46
West Wits0.690.690.801.001.21
Tanzania0.620.690.880.660.63
Geita0.620.690.880.660.63
USA-0.000.000.000.20
Cripple Creek & Victor-0.000.000.000.20
  • The Obuasi redevelopment project poured its first gold in December 2019. It will reach its full production by the end of 2020 and is therefore excluded.
International Cyanide Management Code certification
Number of processing plants certified in full compliance to the international cyanide management code1314171515
Percentage of processing plants certified in full compliance to the international cyanide management code8793948379
2019 Land Disturbed / Rehabilitated
OperationTotal land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated opening balanceTotal amount of land newly disturbed within the reporting yearTotal amount of land newly rehabilitated within the reporting period to agreed upon end useTotal amount of land rehabilitated to dateTotal amount of land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated closing balanceTotal land managed
Iduapriem1,519.2317.691.22260.721,535.7013,922.00
West Wits1,310.00--296.001,310.003,744.00
Siguiri1,445.764.7713.90498.901,436.63 159,233.20
Geita2,783.3422.8081.90652.212,724.21 19,627.00
Sunrise Dam1,428.7917.740.43811.081,446.1015,880.78
Tropicana3,107.3762.2661.47334.373,108.16105,800.00
AGA Mineração476.5720.209.50475.36487.2720,562.00
Serra Grande643.3014.086.51103.92650.872,607.78
Cerro Vanguardia1,599.56166.18-45.441,765.7454,000.00
Vaal River4,244.11--1,010.004,244.11 8,253.00
Mine Waste Solutions3,329.33--16.333,329.33 6,722.00
Sadiola2,192.05-184.00351.502,008.0030,260.00
Obuasi1,691.13--207.471,692.1320,146.00
Group25,770.54325.72358.935,063.3025,738.25460,757.76
Rehabilitation liabilities per operation ($ million)
 20192018
OperationRestorationDecommissioningTotalTotal
SOUTH AFRICA15.381.396.675.7
Great Noligwa5.927.533.430.7
TauTona(1)3.516.520.016.9
Mponeng2.22.85.04.7
Legacy projects    
- Vaal River-3.03.02.8
- West Wits-2.82.80.2
- Other0.2-0.20.2
First Uranium SA3.528.732.220.2
CONTINENTAL AFRICA249.9158.8408.7378.3
Ghana    
Iduapriem32.314.046.342.8
Obuasi(2)141.544.8186.3163.2
Guinea    
Siguiri28.525.954.453.1
Mali(3)    
Morila-6.56.57.6
Sadiola12.212.524.726.6
Yatela3.17.810.912.3
DRC    
Kibali(3)-11.511.510.6
Tanzania    
Geita32.335.868.162.1
AUSTRALIA59.537.396.888.5
Australia    
Sunrise Dam28.417.045.440.6
Tropicana31.120.351.447.9
AMERICAS129.038.0167.0137.5
Argentina    
Cerro Vanguardia58.219.177.369.1
Brazil    
AGA Mineração47.114.962.048.6
Serra Grande16.34.020.312.6
United States of America    
Other0.4-0.40.4
Colombia    
La Colosa6.6-6.66.4
Gramalote(3)0.4-0.40.4
453.7315.4769.1680.0
Less equity accounted investments included above(3)(15.7)(38.3)(54.0)(57.5)
Less liabilities held for sale included above(4)(15.1)(81.3)(96.4)-
422.9195.8618.7622.5
  1. (1) Includes Savuka
  2. (2) Includes Mpasatia (Bibiani pit)
  3. (3) The equity-accounted investments refer to the Mali assets, Kibali in the DRC and Gramalote in Colombia.
  4. (4) Includes the liabilities held for sale of Mponeng, Great Noligwa, Tau Tona, VR and WW legacy projects and First Uranium.
IndictorValue2019
Financial implications and opportunities due to climate change0

Climate change poses challenges and opportunities to AngloGold Ashanti and consideration of these factors influences business-planning processes. Regulatory responses to climate change in the form of carbon pricing and budgeting are increasingly being considered in the jurisdictions in which we operate and as more participating countries ratify the 2015 Paris Agreement. Its however noted that economic concerns appear to be delaying the implementation of these in some jurisdictions.

The South African carbon tax was signed into law by President Cyril Ramaphosa and gazetted in May 2019. The first phase of the act came into effect on 1 June 2019. This phase applies to Scope 1 emitters until 31 December 2022 and contains tax-free emission allowances. In 2019, our South African operation’s Scope 1 emissions were under 17Kt and will not attract material carbon taxes.

The Australian Commonwealth Government introduced the Safeguard Mechanism (Rule 2015) to provide a framework for Australia’s largest emitters to measure, report and manage their emissions. It does this by encouraging large facilities, whose net emissions exceed the safeguard threshold, to keep their emissions at or below emissions baselines set by the Clean Energy Regulator. The safeguard mechanism applies to facilities with Scope 1 emissions of more than 100,000 tonnes of CO2-e per financial year. The Australian mining operations (Sunrise Dam and Tropicana) had emissions baselines set in 2016 for a 3 year period, to meet the requirements of the safeguard mechanism. During the 2018/19 FY Tropicana’s emissions were within its authorised threshold and Sunrise Dam was required to purchase carbon credits to offset emissions that were 0.8% above its threshold, the cost of which was immaterial. The Safeguard Mechanism (Rule 2015) has been amended to adopt government-determined prescribed production variables. The Australian mining operations are in the process of re-calculating their respective emissions baselines in 2020 to comply with the changes in legislation.2019 Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP). Financial implications and opportunities due to climate change are discussed in more detail there. Our annual reports to the CDP are available on the CDP website (www.cdp.net) and the AngloGold Ashanti website (www.anglogoldashanti.com).

Number of non-monetary sanction0None
Total number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species0
Critically Endangered Category:

IUCN: One species of amphibian at La Colosa Project.

National: One tree species at Gramalote.

Endangered Category:

IUCN: One species of mammal at AGA Mineração (Brazil); one species of plant, two species of bird and one species of amphibian at La Colosa Project; one species of mammal and one species of amphibian at Gramalote Project.

National: One species of plant and one species of fish at AGA Mineração Brazil and 2 plant species at La Colosa.

Vulnerable Category:

IUCN: Six species of tree at Obuasi; one species of bird and two species of fish at AGA Mineração (Brazil); two species of plant, one species of amphibian, two species of mammal and three species of bird at La Colosa Project (Colombia); one species of mammal, two species of bird and one species of tree at Gramalote project Colombia); 2 species of tree, one species of plant and one species of insect at Geita (Tanzania).

National: One species of plant in South Africa. Two species of plant, two species of mammal and one species of fish at AGA Mineração (Brazil); 3 Flora Species at La Colosa and 2 species of tree at Gramalote.

Near Threatened Category:

IUCN: Two species of mammal at Cerro Vanguardia; two species of bird and two species of mammals at AGA Mineração Brazil; one species of amphibian and one species of bird at La Colosa Project; one species of mammal, one species of bird and two species of tree at Gramalote and one species of plant in South Africa.

National: Two species of plants in South Africa, one amphibian and one bird at La Colosa.

Habitats protected or restored 2019
RPPN (Private natural heritage reserve)Hectares protectedClosest operational siteYear officially registeredPrimary habitat type
AGA Mineração
RPPN Mata Samuel de Paula147,83Queiroz Industrial Plant2000Atlantic forest biome
RPPN Cuiabá726,35Cuiabá Mine2007Atlantic forest biome
RPPN Córrego do Sítio I180,00Córrego do Sítio Mine2016Atlantic forest biome
RPPN Córrego do Sítio II328,00Queiroz Industrial Plant2016Atlantic forest biome
IndictorValue2019
Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water0The 401,000 ha Niger-Tinkisso Ramsar site is an extensive area of river and freshwater ponds and marshes between and around the Tinkisso and Niger Rivers, however its boundaries are not clearly defined. As many as 101,000 ha of the Ramsar site may overlap the (159,000 ha) Siguiri mine concession in Guinea. The mine abstracts less than 0.5% of the Tinkisso River's annual flow.
Value of environmental fines0AngloGold Ashanti defines a significant fine as one that exceeds USD100,000. No such fines were paid in 2019, however a potential fine over this threshold is currently proceeding through a dispute resolution mechanism in Argentina.
Number of sites that have been assessed as requiring a BMP15AngloGold Ashanti adopted a Biodiversity Management Standard in 2014. It requires all active AGA-managed operations or major projects to undertake biodiversity risk assessments and where necessary, implement a Biodiversity Action Plan. By the end of 2019, not all the AGA-managed operations or major projects had completed the required biodiversity risk assessments. (Note that Activities were suspended at La Colosa due to a Force Majeure).
Number of sites in need of a BMP that have a BMP in place and operational13By the end of 2019, 13 of the 15 AGA-managed operations had developed biodiversity action plans.
Number of company operations that have closure plans14All AngloGold Ashanti-managed operations have a closure plan in place. Details of closure-related liabilities are presented in the annual Integrated Report and financial provisions for closure are given in the Annual Financial Statements.
Percentage of company operations that have closure plans100%100% of AngloGold Ashanti operations have a closure plan in place. Details of closure liabilities are given in the Integrated annual report and financial provisions for closure are given in the Annual Financial Statements.
2019 water reused Percentage of water re-used as per the MCA Water Accounting Framework
(%)
Total volume of water recycled and reused by the organisation
(kl)
Total water used for production purposes
(kl)
Siguiri737,083,05129,384,437
Geita643,228,60512,733,947
Tropicana506,800,6106,861,941
Vaal River (Input)503,580,5806,486,690
West Wits (Input)773,257,37924,519,943
Cerro Vanguardia811,512,3846,979,205
Serra Grande81442,5964,389,745
Sunrise Dam 56 2,923,802 5,195,109
Mine Waste Solutions897,778,75590,040,523
Sadiola655,408,75713,001,095
Iduapriem8380,49612,665,661
AGA Mineração6617,346,49426,290,386
Group76 228,305,929301,890,091
  • The Obuasi redevelopment project poured its first gold in December 2019. It will reach its full production by the end of 2020 and is therefore excluded.
2019 Interactions with water
  Volume of water by quality
MetricDescriptionHigh (ML)Low (ML)Total (ML)
Imports for useSurface water 21,637- 21,637
Groundwater 2,864 13,51716,380
Third party water9,880-9,880
Total water Imports34,380 13,51747,896
Harvested RainfallDirect Rainfall 23,654- 23,654
Indirect Runoff 2,034- 2,034
Total Rainfall 25,688- 25,688
Discharge from process systemTo surface water1 7794 462 6,241
To groundwater---
To third parties---
Total discharge 1,779 4,462 6,241
ConsumptionEvaporation, entrainment or Other 67,343- 67,343
EfficiencyWater reuse (%)  75.76%
DiversionsThrough and from operations 17,003- 17,003
  • Ref: 2017 ICMM consistent water reporting guide.
  • High Quality: Less or equal to 1000 ppm of total dissolved solids.
  • Low Quality: Greater than 1000 ppm of total dissolved solids.
  • The Obuasi redevelopment project poured its first gold in December 2019. It will reach its full production by the end of 2020 and is therefore excluded.
Water discharge 2019
LocationQuantityDestinationpH LevelConductivity
AGA Mineração2,582,307 kL of Queiroz Plant effluent water with an annual average pH of 6.9 and a conductivity of 2.53 mS/cm, was discharged to the Velhas River following arsenic precipitation with ferric sulphate.Velhas River6.92.53 mS/cm
AGA Mineração1,879,360 kL of excess Córrego do Sítio Mine water with an annual average pH of 8.09 and a conductivity of 4.33 mS/cm, was discharged to the Conceição River following removal of suspended solids through flocculation.Conceição River8.094.33 mS/cm
Serra GrandeAn estimated 1,198,578 kL of excess water with an annual average pH of 7.29 and a conductivity of 1.83 mS/cm, was discharged to a tributary of the Red River following arsenic precipitation and cyanide destruction at the Final Effluent Treatment Plant.Red River7.291.83 mS/cm
Serra GrandeAn estimated 36,702 kL of purified sewage effluent with an annual average pH of 7.13 and a conductivity of 0.85 mS/cm was released from the wastewater treatment plant to a tributary of the Red River.Red River7.130.85 mS/cm
West WitsA volume of 544,132 kL of purified sewage effluent was released from the Aquatic Dam to the Elandsfonteinspruit, with an average pH of 7.90 and an average conductivity of 0.45 mS/cmElandsfontein Spruit7.90.45 mS/cm
Water diversion 2019
LocationQuantityDestinationpH LevelConductivity
IduapriemA volume of 9,840,511kL of directly captured rainfall and surface runoff was diverted from the Block 7 & 8 pit to the environment, having an average pH of 7.21 and a conductivity of 0.43 mS/cm. No treatment was required.Agonabeng Stream7.210.43 mS/cm
Serra GrandeAn estimated 705,838 kL of excess water from the Mina Nova mine having an annual average pH of 7.42 and a conductivity of 0.97 mS/cm, was diverted to the Vermelho River following suspended solids precipitation with flocculant.Vermelho River7.420.97 mS/cm
Serra GrandeAn estimated 440,400 kL of excess water from the Palmeiras Mine having an annual average pH of 7.33 and a conductivity of 0.76 mS/cm, was diverted to the Gerais stream following suspended solids precipitation with flocculant.Gerais stream7.330.76 mS/cm
AGA Mineração46,808 kL of Cuiabá Mine effluent water with an annual average pH of 7.37 and a conductivity of 0.53 mS/cm, was discharged to the Sabará River following pH adjustment with sodium hydroxide.Sabará River7.370.53 mS/cm
AGA Mineração578,882 kL of excess Lamego Mine water with an annual average pH of 7.89 and a conductivity of 0.82 mS/cm, was diverted to the Papa Farinha and Pataca Creek (Conceição River) following removal of suspended solids through flocculation.Conceição River7.890.82 mS/cm
AGA Mineração500,769 kL of excess Córrego do Sítio Mine water with an annual average pH of 7.8 and a conductivity of 0.85 mS/cm, was discharged to the Conceição River following removal of suspended solids through flocculation.Conceição River7.80.85 mS/cm
ObuasiA volume of 939,513 kL of excess water from the South Treatment Plant’s OTP Pond was treated and diverted from the South Reverse Osmosis Plant to the Nyam River having an annual average pH of 7.24 and a conductivity of 0.44 mS/cm.Nyam River7.240.44 mS/cm
ObuasiA volume of 2,145,828 kL of water from Pond 3 was treated and diverted from the South Reverse Osmosis Plant to the Nyam River having an annual average pH of 7.49 and a conductivity of 0.50 mS/cmNyam River7.490.50 mS/cm
ObuasiA volume of 240,269 kL of treated runoff water from the Pompora and Kokoteasua TSFs was diverted via the Pompora Reverse Osmosis Plant to the Kwabrafo River having an annual average pH of 7.49 and a conductivity of 0.08 mS/cm.Kwabrafo River7.490.08 mS/cm
Sunrise DamA volume of 1,563,739 kL of groundwater from underground and pit dewatering having an annual average pH of 7.46 and a conductivity of 215.22 mS/cm, was diverted to Lake Carey, a salt lake.Lake Carey7.46215.22 mS/cm

Prioritised SDGs

6 CLEAN WATER AND SANITATION
  • 6.3. By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimising release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally.

  • 6.4. By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of fresh water to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity.

  • 6.5. By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate.


11 SUSTAINABLE CITIES
AND COMMUNITIES
  • 11.4. Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.


12 RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION
  • 12.2. By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of national resources.

  • 12.4. By 2030, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimise their adverse impacts on human health and the environment.

  • 12.5. By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

  • 12.6. Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle.


13 CLIMATE ACTION
  • 13.1. Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries.

  • 13.3. Improve education, awareness raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.


15 LIFE ON LAND
  • 15.1. By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

  • 15.3. By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world.