Integrated talent management

Central to this is a restructuring undertaken at the end of 2021, to put in place an organisational structure to support our new Operating Model. This involved careful management to ensure we have the right individuals, in the right place, doing the right work.

This restructuring involved introducing the new Operating Model and its supporting organisational structure to new business units, functional support roles, mandates, reporting lines and systems. At the time the organisational restructuring took place, we had started a culture and values transformation journey with a strategic intent to create an inspiring work environment for our people to ensure the delivery of sustainable business goals.

We relocated our corporate office in Johannesburg to Rosebank, a developing business district north of the downtown area with distinct advantages for employees over our former location. During all of this change, our staff demonstrated great resilience, especially since we were in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

NEW OPERATING MODEL AND PROJECT THRIVE

In 2021 we launched Project Thrive with the aim of structuring the Company in the best way possible to ensure its long-term success. As part of the project, which aims to streamline the organisation and bring significant efficiencies, we introduced a new Operating Model. This is now being embedded through all our regions and operations across the Group. We have updated role descriptions and made clear role accountabilities. KPIs have been better aligned and we will hold functional clarity workshops in 2022.

Functional support roles that used to reside at three or four places in the Company now sit in two. As a result of the restructuring, we reduced the number of roles, particularly those located in the central function structures.

We limited retrenchments by offering early retirement and voluntary severance packages late last year. It was a challenging time for many, and Human Resources and Group Communications worked to ensure that employees were well informed through the process and that support was provided.

In South Africa, we ran a series of town halls and further information – in the form of employee briefs, presentations and updates on the new structure – was issued group-wide.

The workforce transition process was rolled-out in line with the applicable regulatory requirements of the various countries in which we operate. We worked to provide a meaningful consultation process and considered, among other things, ways in which we could minimise the number of potential retrenchments and options to mitigate the adverse effect of any potential retrenchments.

Employee consultations took place in a genuine and procedurally fair way and decisions were made without bias and grounded by our core organisational values. Key to this process was treating people with dignity and respect.

Employees were urged to contact their respective Executive and Human Resource Business Partners when, and if, they needed support and information.

We understood that the process could cause anxiety and we set up an on-site counselling service at our corporate office and offered other aspects of employee support, such as continuing to offer further counselling services through our partnership with Careways / Life Employee Health Services.

We continued to offer our longstanding employee support options at our corporate office where employees could, and can, contact Careways – available 24 hours a day seven days a week – for assistance using a toll-free number, or by contacting the national care centre. People can also SMS, email or use WhatsApp to contact a counsellor.

TALENT MANAGEMENT

AngloGold Ashanti acknowledges that effective talent management practices are important to ensure the long-term sustainability of our operations and our global competitiveness. We have made important strides in strengthening talent management practices in line with industry and global best practices.

A comprehensive talent and succession planning guideline was developed, including standards and toolkits, to ensure a consistent approach across business and to equip line managers to make effective talent and succession decisions. The Group talent team worked with regional and functional human resources teams to run capacity-building sessions with line managers to introduce the new guideline.

One of the most significant enhancements to the 2021 talent and succession review process was the reintroduction of levels of work used in the determination of successor potential and readiness levels. In line with this, we have strengthened our approach in successor capability building into senior roles for purposes of effectively identifying successors for critical roles and to address development gaps to ensure professional growth and career progression of successors. This was complemented by a focused drive to ensure manager once removed (MOR) discussions took place during the year to strengthen the engagement of talent and to ensure the execution of planned development interventions and readiness of talent (i.e. 91% of Executive Committee successors participated in MOR discussions).

The 2021 talent and succession review process resulted in a succession coverage of six successors per role for all roles at stratum IV level and higher across various readiness levels ranging from ready now to three to five years. There is also a respectable age distribution among successors, with 52% of successors in the age 40-49 years of age category and 36% between 50 and 59 years.

Due to the changing future of work and evolving learning and development landscape, we are leveraging virtual learning to meet the need for continuous learning and professional growth of our employees. An online learning and development platform was piloted to provide learning and development interventions on demand.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

AngloGold Ashanti remains committed to creating a diverse and inclusive workforce, aligned to the UNSDGs (SDG 5, 8 and 10) and the UNGC. Leadership teams are responsible for the delivery of diversity targets, which better enable the organisation to achieve its goals. In this regard there are clearly defined priorities and actions for the next two to five years, with associated implementation guidelines to ensure diversity and inclusion objectives are embedded in all processes.

Diversity and inclusion assessments

Regional assessments were conducted to better understand the barriers and challenges to increased diversity and inclusion that exist on mine sites. The findings from the assessments remain our compass to guide the application of our diversity and inclusion principles across our operations through our Global Women’s Forum and Global Diversity and Inclusion framework to foster the empowerment of all staff irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation.

To address the findings of the regional assessments, we have:

  • Conducted unconscious bias workshops for the board, the Executive Committee and all senior leaders across the organisation
  • Established Diversity Committees across our operations
  • Reviewed and updated our Sexual Harassment Policy
  • Shared successes through networking, including through annual diversity and inclusion conferences and a new Diversity and Inclusion portal
  • Participated in the Bloomberg Gender Equity Index to benchmark progress and achievements

While there has been a reduction in the total average number of employees over the years due to strategic business decisions, the Company has remained focused on ensuring that the diversity and inclusion profile of the workforce is not significantly affected by the ongoing strategic changes in the organisation.

People lie at the heart of AngloGold Ashanti and 2021 saw our new CEO move to build an increasingly efficient, flexible and sustainable organisation to secure the future growth and prosperity of the Company.

Prioritised SDGs

Related case study


Our performance



Indicator20212020201920182017
Total average number of employees (number)
Group30 56136 95234 26344 24951 480
Permanent14 17720 73019 87429 96836 072
Contractors16 38416 22214 38914 28115 408
Training and Development expenditure ($ million)
South Africa05.748.0111.0628.34
Americas3.091.060.961.612.26
Australia1.641.140.981.201.20
Africa2.382.821.551.304.50
Number of grievances relating to unfair labour practices filed during the reporting period (number)
Group14616014
Number of strike or lock out exceeding one week (number)
Group10000
South Africa Employment Equity across all levels (%)
Board3847363645
Top Management8250434343
Senior Management4645454442
Middle Management6256545552
Junior Management9565646160
Core and critical skills652525356
Proportion of senior management from local community (%)
Argentina100100100100100
Australia7375788282
Brazil91949393100
Corporate9290919391
Ghana6853565644
Guinea3638333325
Mali0050500
Tanzania332520140
Colombia82756967100
South Africa010010010099
USA8786888987
Employees covered by collective bargaining (%)
Argentina9090999999
Australia00000
Brazil100100100100100
Colombia00000
Ghana8780939496
Guinea9494969795
Mali099989998
South Africa096979691
Tanzania8586858690
USA00000
Total quarter average number of employees (number)
Group31 5430000
Permanent14 3250000
Contractors17 2180000

Composition of governance bodies: Numbers

Board composition by nationality (number)
South African40000
American20000
Australian00000
British10000
Canadian10000
Ghanaian10000
Other00000
Colombian10000
Board composition by HDSA (number)
HDSA40000
Non-HDSA00000
Non-South Africans60000
Board composition by gender (number)
Men66700
Women44400
Executive composition by nationality (number)
South African60000
American10000
Australian10000
British00000
Canadian00000
Ghanaian00000
Colombian10000
Other00000
Executive composition by HDSA (number)
HDSA40000
Non-HDSA10000
Non-South Africans30000
Executive composition by gender (number)
Men66600
Women33300

Composition of governance bodies: Percentages

Board composition by nationality (%)
South African4044454555
American2022181818
Australian00999
British10119189
Canadian10111890
Ghanaian1011000
Other00009
Colombian100000
Board composition by HDSA (%)
HDSA4033453345
Non-HDSA01102210
Non-South Africans6056554545
Board composition by gender (%)
Men6456647364
Women3644362736
Executive composition by nationality (%)
South African6767565656
American11001111
Australian1122111111
British000011
Canadian01122110
Ghanaian00000
Colombian110000
Other00111111
Executive composition by HDSA (%)
HDSA4433333633
Non-HDSA113311922
Non-South Africans3333565545
Executive composition by gender (%)
Men6767676767
Women3333333333
Indicator20212020201920182017
Minimum periods regarding operational changes
Argentina Four weeks. More 5 years worked: 2 month Less 5 years worked: 1 month  Employees who have worked more than 5 years get 2 months in advance.
Less that 5 years get 1 month.
N/A N/A
Brazil   4 weeks 30 days. 30 days. 30 days.
Colombia n/a Colombia does not have collective agreements 4 Weeks – only for fixed terms it’s one month, however, no time as per Colombia law no notice period for Perm employees

4 weeks apply only for fixed-term contract.
We don’t use this type of contract frequently,
but in open-ended contract we can manage any time.

N/A. N/A
Guinea 1 Month One month Grades and Notice:
•E–1 Month (Junior staff)
•AM – 2 Months (Artisans, Team leaders)
•C and above – 3 Months (Officers, Supervisors, Superintendents, Managers) 
1. One month for unskilled/semi-skilled labour.
2. Two months’ for skilled labour.
3. Three months’ for senior staff.
1. One month for unskilled/semi-skilled labour.
2. Two months’ for skilled labour.
3. Three months’ for senior staff.
Tanzania None 4.28 WEEKS EQUIVALENT TO 30 DAYS 1 month. One month. One month.